POISON PREVENTION

What is Poison? A poison can be almost any substance that is not intended for human consumption. Many poisonous products look nonpoisonous, and some common products and medicines can be harmful when not used according to directions. Some examples of poisons include, but are not limited to: Household cleaners, Medicines, Cosmetics, Antifreeze, Oil of wintergreen, Hand gel, Carbon monoxide, Certain Plants, and Batteries

 

DID YOU KNOW?

In 1999, the number of unintentional poisoning deaths in North Carolina was 279. By 2009, that number had risen to 1,036. In 2007, the North Carolina unintentional poisonings rate was 3% higher than the U.S. rate. Since then, both rates have continued to climb.

COIN BATTERIES

Coin batteries are a hazard which is gaining national attention due to their increasing prevalence. Nickel sized batteries; about 3/4" in diameter are large enough to get stuck in a child's throat. There batteries can burn through tissue in less than 2 hours, which can result in serious injury and even death. Kids under the age of 4 are at the greatest risk to these burn and death hazards. In 2010 alone, there were more than 3,400 button battery swallowing cases in the US. These resulted in 19 serious injuries and deaths. The number of cases resulting in serious injury and death has more than quadrupled in the past 5 years. If your child has swallowed a button battery, please contact the National Button Ingestion hotline, at (202) 625-3333. For more information about button battery hazards, please visit The Battery Controlled website, which was created through a partnership of Energizer and Safe Kids USA.

OPERATION MEDICINE DROP

Operation Medicine Drop is a take back initiative that is part of a grassroots effort working on medication disposal. By providing safe and secure ways for people to get rid of unwanted medications, Operation Medicine Drop helps prevent accidental poisonings and drug abuse while protecting our waters. This is a partnership of the Riverkeepers of NC, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of NC and local law enforcement agencies.

 

Operation Medicine Drop will be joining the Drug Enforcement Agency for its' annual National Take Back Initiative on October 29, 2011. North Carolina holds it's annual "Spring Cleaning" Operation Medicine Drop the 3rd week of March to coincide with Poison Prevention Week. Over 4 million doses were collected during the 300 events in the spring of 2011.

 

Safe Kids North Carolina and its affiliates, such as Safe Kids Durham County partner with the State Bureau of Investigation, the Drug Enforcement Administration and other agencies to set up Operation Medicine Drop events throughout the state where people can safely dispose of old or unneeded prescription and over-the-counter medications. Medicine Drop events throughout the state provide locations where people can safely dispose of old or unneeded prescription and over-the-counter medications.

WHERE TO MAKE A DROP IN DURHAM?

There is a permanent Medicine Drop station at the Durham Police Department in downtown Durham.

IS IT CANDY OR MEDICINE?

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