HYPERTHERMIA

Heat is much more dangerous to children than it is to adults. When left in a hot vehicle, a young child’s core body temperature may increase three to five times faster than an adult's. This could cause permanent injury or even death. When the body temperature reaches 104 degrees the internal organs start to shut down. When it reaches 107 degrees the person dies. Leaving a child in a vehicle for a "quick" errand - even for a minute - could be a deadly mistake. Unfortunately, a child alone in a car on a mild day can become overheated quickly. This can lead to tragedy in just a few minutes.

 

If you see a child unattended in a car, call 911

 

DID YOU KNOW?

Every 10 days a child dies from being left in a hot car.

A: Avoid heatstroke-related injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. Make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own.

C: Create reminders by putting something in the back of your car next to your child that you need at your final destination, such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine. Many child heat stroke deaths occur because parents and caregivers become distracted and exit their vehicle without their child.

T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. One call could save a life.

Since 1998, approximately 550 children died from heat stroke while unattended in a car.

On days when the temperature exceeds 86°F, the internal temperature can quickly reach upwards of 130°F. A car's temperature can increase by 29 degrees in just 20 minutes. That means on an 80 degree day, the inside of a closed car could reach 109 degrees in 20 minutes.

WATCH THE VIDEO TO THE RIGHT TO SEE A SIMULATION.

RECENT PREVENTABLE HYPERTHERMIA DEATHS

With 2010 being the worst year on record, with 49 deaths, 2013 is shaping up to be just as bad if not worse.   Help prevent these deaths by remembering to ACT.

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